GPS Tracking for Children and Cars

GPS Tracking Devices for Children & Teens

GPS tracking devices for teens is becoming the best friend of any parent concerned about the safety of their child. According to Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), "The risk of motor vehicle crashes is higher among 16- to 19-year-olds than among any other age group. In fact, per mile driven, teen drivers ages 16 to 19 are four times more likely than older drivers to crash."

While this is a sobering fact, there are steps parents and guardians can take to monitor and help avoid their teen driver from becoming one of these statistics by using a GPS tracking device. By using our GPS tracking system tools, a Geo-Fence, or virtual fence, can be placed around a specific area on the map that once the fence is broken (the GPS tracking device either enters or leaves that Geo-Fence), an email or text message alert can be triggered to your mobile phone or email inbox. Additionally, the speed of the vehicle can be monitored to ensure that your teen is driving at a safe pace. While the ultimate concern is for the safety of your teen driver, this will also ensure that your insurance rates remain where they are or even decrease due to these preventative measures.

Teen drivers are not the only reason to have a GPS tracking device for a child. With a continued increase in the divorce rate, we get many calls from parents who want to use a GPS tracking device for a toddlers and preschoolers who are involved in a custody case.

Child tracking using a GPS tracking device can enhance the trust between a teen and their parent. Knowing that your child is safe at all times will provide you the peace of mind all parents wish for.

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